Chinese peaches

A co-worker asked me if I could paint some peaches onto a plate.  I said, sure, but only if she could not find anyone else, because I had never painted on plates before (only on paper).  I said I didn’t want to mess up her plate.  But she wanted me to paint the peaches anyway.  Well, so here they are…

She gave me the little red envelope (for me to copy from), and the plate, which she said only cost $1.50, so it would be okay if I messed it up.  *grin*  She asked if I could paint the peaches in colour, and the words too.  Actually, she had two envelopes, but I chose this one because the Chinese characters looked easier to copy in this one. 

So I took her plate, and did a rough draft in watercolour.  Of course, that was an easy five-minute job.  Then I confidently took out my husband’s acrylics (with his permission) and mixed red and yellow to get the peach colour.  I mixed in a lot of water so it would be kind of like watercolours (and more familiar for me to work with).  I laid down the colour of both peaches and waited for them to dry, but the right-side peach dried with lighter spots!  I did not want to go back in and disturb how the paint lay.  Though I should have.  But going on…  I got to the stem and realized that I needed brown.  Uh oh. 

No brown in my husband’s acrylics!  Only red, blue, and yellow.  Um, okay.  The last time I mixed brown was more than a decade ago, in a community college art class specializing in colours, which I ended up dropping because mixing colours was too difficult for me!!!  So I asked him “What’s brown???”  He said “red, blue, and green”.  So I thought… okay… green is yellow and blue, so that would be a double dose of blue, plus red plus yellow.  Nope.  I kept adding more and more pigment, and it was turning purple, due to the high amount of blue… finally I asked “How do you get brown using purple?”  He said “add green”.  *SIGH*  Okay, that meant, add yellow and blue.  I decided to just try to add yellow and not blue, since there was already a ton of blue.  At this point, I was wondering why the heck he did not buy brown acrylic paint!!!  And then I remembered that it was because I persuaded him not to (so I could buy more of what I wanted to buy!).  Well, I finally got brown.  But now I had a huge pool of brown, when I only needed a tiny bit for the stem.  Argh!

And then I painted the leaves, and noticed that the brush strokes were really evident once the paint was more dry.  So I used the brushstrokes to emulate the leaf veins.  My husband looked at it at this point and was impressed, but said, “uh, honey, those are not what peaches look like!  If you want, we have some real peaches in the fridge…”  *laugh*  Actually, in real life I have never seen peaches this shape either. 

And then I really, really wanted to stamp some cards instead of continuing with this, but I had to finish this before the acrylic paint dried!  So I stampeded through the copying of the characters, which shows.  But I thought back to the fact that it was only a $1.50 plate (and I really wanted to make some cards right then and there!!!), so eh *shrug* I didn’t re-do it.  But I should have.

I don’t know what the characters mean, though I am sure it is something nice and pleasant. 

My co-worker seemed pleased with the result… at any rate, she refrained from remarking on the terrible copying of the characters and the light spots on the right-side peach.  She did say she liked the watercolour one better than the plate one!  (yes, um, that’s because I have brown in watercolour pigment).  Well, I hope she liked it. 

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3 Responses to “Chinese peaches”

  1. Cindy H. Says:

    Wow, that’s your first time painting on plates?!! You’re very talented!!

  2. Nancy Says:

    Sophie this plate is beautiful 🙂 I would be so pleased to have someone do this for me. I’m sure she loved it!
    Nancy

  3. Charmaine Says:

    I’ve never seen peaches that looked like that either 🙂 But it did turn out nice.

    Charmaine

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